students smiling outside

Breadcrumb Navigation

Oak Report: Gratitude & Kindness

 

Gratitude is a central value that we practice, not just during November in recognition of Kindness Month, but throughout the year at Oakwood. The Fish! For Schools Philosophy, guides how we interact with each other with a focus on Choosing Your Attitude. It gives us an understanding of the control we each have in approaching our day and that the attitude and mindset we bring to school can have a positive impact on those around us. Research shows that regular gratitude practices can make a difference in a student's mental and physical well-being. We make a point to help students find positive moments in each day and provide regular opportunities to celebrate their joys with one another. 

Kindness is a strongly held value at Oakwood and is woven into who we are and how we expect to interact with each other. We believe in the importance of valuing differences, celebrating individuals, and showing respect through actions and words. As a small community, we have opportunities to model, teach, and celebrate kindness and acceptance on a daily basis. 

The work we do to teach our students about their brains and the value of neurodiversity has many benefits. It helps students understand who they are as learners and the potential in their unique makeup. It empowers them with the understanding that they can grow and change their brains through hard work and practice. 

It also gives us a space to talk about differences and how strengths may present themselves in diverse ways. It helps us create a community of acceptance, encouragement, and kindness. At Oakwood, being kind is not just a rule, but through the lens of kindness, we encourage students to see value in all people and help them with the language to convey that to each other. 

Our days can feel very full. Obligations can feel overwhelming. At Oakwood, we continue to center ourselves with gratitude and acts of kindness, and we do our best to impart these values to our students. 

 

Click here to read Erin's blog on the Value of Teaching Students about their Brains.